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on Thursday, 06 November 2014 14:28.

Our dog of the week …

 

Meet Yukon …Though I'm an adult, I have some-what puppy energy! Most Husky’s do.  I'm just so excited to be with people and I want to learn. High energy dogs make the best running partners and are of high intelligence.  We often come across as unruly but that is only because we crave – and need – mental stimulation. I wish for a yard to run around in and a leash to take walks on.  I am anxious to go home and begin my life with you - and the rest of your friends and family too.  I may need training so feel free to sign me up for classes – or just give me a little time and you might be surprised to learn what I know.  I want – and will - become the companion you've always wanted and the good dog that I was born to be.  Don't delay ... come to see me today!  I am anxiously awaiting your arrival :).  Thank you Olivia Mandala, photographer, for your kindness in my photo-shoot.

 

Note: Please keep in mind that all adoptable pets need time to decompress once they enter a home. For some it will happen quickly and for others it might take a few weeks. You'll want to be understanding of what they have been through and their level of insecurity. We ask that you treat all of them as if they were an 8 week old puppy. Assume they know nothing and begin at step one. You'll soon know what they are capable of and what behaviors you will need to kindly work on with your new family member. It's called commitment! And, that's what these pets want more than anything!

on Thursday, 23 October 2014 12:06.

Meet the adorable and FUN Aaron ... 

 

Aaron is a Neapolitan Mastiff – often confused with the Cane Corso Mastiff which is often confused with a very large Pit Bull.  He doesn't show real well thru the cage but take him out and he was a riot.  He loves to play and he loves his toys.  He has cherry-eye which is a fixable condition.  Google this condition for more information on it.  When adopted, Pay It Forward For Pets nonprofit, will fund the surgery to correct this issue.  Don't delay ... give this big boy his home today.

 

Note:  Please keep in mind that all adoptable pets need time to decompress once they enter a home.  For some it will happen quickly and for others it might take a few weeks.  You'll want to be understanding of what they have been through and their level of insecurity.  We ask that you treat all of them as if they were an 8 week old puppy.  Assume they know nothing and begin at step one.  You'll soon know what they are capable of and what behaviors you will need to kindly work on with your new family member.  It's called commitment!  And, that's what these pets want more than anything!

 

What is Cherry-eye?

 

Cherry eye in dogs isn’t a life threatening condition, but if left untreated can cause your dog eye problems later on. If you’ve ever seen a red bulge in the corner of your dog’s eye, you’ve seen firsthand what cherry eye looks like. What causes cherry eye in dogs, and how is it treated?

 

A dog’s eye has three eyelids: an upper and lower lid, as well as a third eyelid we seldom see. The importance of the third eyelid is to give added protection to the dog’s eyes. It acts like a wipe to help keep the eye clear of dust and debris and has a tear gland that produces around 35% of the moisture to the dog’s eye. Sometimes the gland in the third eyelid, located in the corner of the eye next to the dog’s nose, slips out of place and bulges. We see it as a red or pinkish blob, and this bulge is what’s called cherry eye.

 

Why it slips out of place is not clear, but if it happens in one eye, more than likely it will happen in the other, although it can be months later. What you want to pay attention to in your dog’s eye is any watery or thick discharge, a red or pink blob in the corner of their eye, any redness in the lining of their eyelid or if your dog is pawing at his eye.

 

For unknown reasons, the connective tissue around the tear gland becomes weak and starts to move around. Movement irritates the gland which leads to swelling that can produce a mucous or clear discharge. It’s possible cherry eye will correct itself within a couple of weeks, but it’s best not to wait. If it doesn’t correct itself, the longer the gland is out of place, the more swelling there is. This makes it harder to reposition it, and there’s a greater chance it will happen again. Left untreated, cherry eye can lead to more serious eye problems later on. You need to have your dog examined by your vet as soon as you notice the out-of-place gland.

 

It’s not understood why some dogs get cherry eye, but it’s thought the cause could be from a parasite, some kind of bacterial infection, dermatitis, possible sun damage, cancer, fungal infection or it could be a result of a problem with the dog’s immune system. Whatever the case, cherry eye is hereditary, so it’s best not to breed a dog that has developed this condition.

 

Treatment for cherry eye is done under local anesthesia to push the gland back into place.

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